Tag Archives: A Place for Us

‘A Place for Us’ by Fatima Farheen Mirza

“A stunning novel about love, compassion, cruelty, and forgiveness–the very things that make families what they are.”

A Place for Us unfolds the lives of an Indian-American Muslim family, gathered together in their Californian hometown to celebrate the eldest daughter, Hadia’s, wedding – a match of love rather than tradition. It is here, on this momentous day, that Amar, the youngest of the siblings, reunites with his family for the first time in three years. Rafiq and Layla must now contend with the choices and betrayals that led to their son’s estrangement – the reckoning of parents who strove to pass on their cultures and traditions to their children; and of children who in turn struggle to balance authenticity in themselves with loyalty to the home they came from.”

As much as a I love a twisting page-turner, this book reminded me that it’s also nice to read a thoughtful compelling family mystery at a more relaxed pace. As the narrative switches back and forth between various voices, depth of character and insight into relationship are achieved in a beautiful way. Transplanted culture can be difficult and complicated and I found the latter part of the novel very poignant when the father honestly shares his perspective on how things might have been different. The smallest decisions can lead to the deepest betrayals. Mirza deals deftly, hopefully, and gracefully with delicate subjects like guilt, misunderstanding, regret, and loss.

Mirza is a graduate of the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop which is a common denominator in many of the authors that I have enjoyed and was championed by Sarah Jessica Parker, another one of the celebrities who are endorsing books (others include Reese Witherspoon and of course Oprah). This book does have a slower pace and may not be for everyone, but I found it held my interest, was definitely moving, and was a joy to read. Here is an interview with the author that highlights the author’s maturity beyond her years: